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instructional_design:elaboration_theory [2011/08/24 13:48]
jpetrovic [What is elaboration theory?]
instructional_design:elaboration_theory [2012/01/12 11:42] (current)
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 The key principle of the elaboration theory is that the **content** being taught should be organized **starting from the simplest** and then increasing order of complexity and that learner has to **develop a concept** in which new ideas will be meaningful and well accepted. ​ The key principle of the elaboration theory is that the **content** being taught should be organized **starting from the simplest** and then increasing order of complexity and that learner has to **develop a concept** in which new ideas will be meaningful and well accepted. ​
  
-In context of elaboration theory, Reigeluth distinguishes between domain expertise (the process of becoming an expert in the body of knowledge of a more theoretical discipline) and task expertise (the process of becoming an expert in the procedural knowledge of a discipline involving more practical tasks). In order to teach a student to become one of the two, elaboration theory suggests instruction should be organized in the following **eight strategies**(([[http://​www.springerlink.com/​content/​m9380ql6k1107801/​|Reigeluth,​ Charles M. In search of a better way to organize instruction:​ The elaboration theory. Journal of Instructional Development 2, no. 3 : 8-15, 1979.]] Cited by [[http://​www.personal.psu.edu/​wxh139/​Elaborate.htm|Ho,​ Wenyi. Reigeluth’s Elaboration Theory.]]))(([[http://​www.eric.ed.gov/​ERICWebPortal/​detail?​accno=ED348040|Wilson,​ Brent, and Peggy Cole. A critical review of elaboration theory.” Educational Technology Research and Development 40, no. 3: 63-79, September 1992.]])):+In context of elaboration theory, Reigeluth distinguishes between domain expertise (the process of becoming an expert in the body of knowledge of a more theoretical discipline) and task expertise (the process of becoming an expert in the procedural knowledge of a discipline involving more practical tasks). In order to teach a student to become one of the two, elaboration theory suggests instruction should be organized in the following **eight strategies**(([[http://​www.springerlink.com/​content/​m9380ql6k1107801/​|Reigeluth,​ Charles M. In search of a better way to organize instruction:​ The elaboration theory. Journal of Instructional Development 2, no. 3 : 8-15, 1979.]] Cited by [[http://​www.personal.psu.edu/​wxh139/​Elaborate.htm|Ho,​ Wenyi. Reigeluth’s Elaboration Theory.]]))(([[http://​www.eric.ed.gov/​ERICWebPortal/​detail?​accno=ED348040|Wilson,​ Brent, and Peggy Cole. A critical review of elaboration theory. Educational Technology Research and Development 40, no. 3: 63-79, September 1992.]])):
  
 [[http://​pjrichardson.com/​edit5370/​mod7.html|{{ ​ :​images:​elaborationtheory.jpg|Elaboration theory graphical overview. Image borrowed from: http://​pjrichardson.com/​edit5370/​mod7.html. Click on the picture to follow the link}}]] [[http://​pjrichardson.com/​edit5370/​mod7.html|{{ ​ :​images:​elaborationtheory.jpg|Elaboration theory graphical overview. Image borrowed from: http://​pjrichardson.com/​edit5370/​mod7.html. Click on the picture to follow the link}}]]
instructional_design/elaboration_theory.txt · Last modified: 2012/01/12 11:42 (external edit)